ARTIST'S STATEMENT


ELIZABETH D'AGOSTINO


 

I am currently working with the notions of longing, human interaction, acclimation, and how the environment begins to inform each of these. Also I am interested in how relationships in space and structure can be re-purposed to create new narratives, modified by their own characteristics and surroundings.

For several years, I have been in interested in human interaction and the adjustment by an organism to environmental and physical change. The areas of entomology and botany and elements or creatures such as birds, insects, and broken fragments of organic elements, remind me of familial sites and surroundings, both past and present. All these embody a sense of individual desire to recapture and restore memories and fragments of historical passages, which influence my daily life. I continue to document and display details of growth and many of these elements are drawn through the imagination, producing new oddities of growth, objects of curiosity and hybridized forms of nature.

I am interested in human artifacts, human bodies, insects, vegetable and animal life, because they are all born out of nature, but are constantly being influenced and modified by culture, space, and environment. In my work, elements are displayed within complex settings as delicate curiosities where the natural world connects with the human-made world. Components that adhere to particular landscapes and specific facets of nature are interwoven into new settings and are repeated within each composition. These are often patterns that are affected by continual growth and change, and are frequently featured as backdrops or motifs printed onto paper. As well, these motifs are repeated, much as they would be in the landscape, and are used to adorn the surfaces of many objects, and are often collected, stored, displayed and passed on like family heirlooms.

My recent projects have evolved into installation and collaboration among print, physical space, digital, and video work. Simplified and symbolized objects reflect both a familiar and odd presence within the work as they reference a connection with the natural world, but also an unconnected relationship with one another. I wish to further my investigations into the transitional place, and the various stages that surround the transformations and adaptations of an object, along with the rooted structures that have formed its environment.